Archive for batman (1989)

The Island of Misfit Toys: Batman (ToyBiz, 1989)

Posted in island of misfit toys with tags , , , on July 6, 2013 by Christopher Pearce

MisfitToys

Today we’re going to be looking at Batman, from the toy line based on the 1989 movie starring Michael Keaton and Jack Nicholson. This toy was produced by Toy Biz in 1989. I bought it for $10 dollars at a small toy convention in New York State. I’m not a “mint on card” collector by any means but I have such a huge amount of affection for this toy line, I thought I’d keep Batman on his blister card and take a shot at collecting the whole line.

Unfortunately, somewhere during the return trip to Ohio, the blister card became warped. The plastic bubble encasing the toy nearly detached from the card.

If ever there was a toy I loved more than this one, I can’t think of it. As an eight year old, my ToyBiz Batman formed the center of my action figure world. ToyBiz held the DC master license for a very short time. Their Batman and DC Superheroes toy lines featured awful articulation, shoddy plastic, and bad joints. Considering the rather rough shape the toy ended up en route to the Buckeye State AND my attendant nostalgia, I am more than happy to release Batman from his plastic prison to see if he holds up to my wonderful memories.

You will, I am sure, be unsurprised by what I found.

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thrift store finds: batman (1989) novelization

Posted in thrift store finds with tags , , , , , , on October 30, 2010 by Christopher Pearce

(Thrift Store Finds is a mostly-weekly “column” of sorts where I discuss some of the cool books I’ve happened upon in my neighborhood St. Vincent DePaul store. Please don’t mistake me for an expert on any of the books I am writing about… I’m just a fan of a bargain.)

I was the last generation of kids for whom home video wasn’t a given. By the time I was in junior high, VHS had pretty well taken over the world, allowing even the most meager of homes the luxury of making it a Blockbuster night. Moreover, as home video rental stores began to get a foothold in towns and cities across the country, the window between a film appearing on the big screen and in your local video store narrowed considerably.

When I was a kid, however… this was not the case. If you wanted to see a movie, you saw it in the movie theaters. If you were lucky, a year or so later, it’d appear on HBO… and a year after that perhaps, on one of the Big Three TV networks. If you wanted to know more about that movie, you’d watch Entertainment Tonight. Many a Monday evening I remember spending glued to the television watching the ageless Mary Hart opine about weekend’s movie grosses.

There was no immediate gratification of a home video release. There was no Internet to sate a budding cinephile’s interest in the making of their favorite movies. It was catch-as-catch-can.

…and this is where movie novelizations picked up some slack.

When I was growing up and you wanted to re-experience that movie you loved so well, they were the only game in town. Novelizations were written retellings of your favorite flick, normally based on the screenplays of major motion pictures rather than the finished product that landed in movie theaters. Stemming from this fact, movie novelizations were often rife with “bonus scenes” and extra perspective on characters in a flick, simply by virtue of having to be written months before the actual movie was completed. After all, a film novelist couldn’t know which scenes in the shooting script would end up on the cutting room floor. As a reader and a movie fan, I always found this thrilling. For instance, I remember reading Alan Dean Foster’s novelization of Alien 3 and enjoying it MORE than I enjoyed the movie at the time.

I’m not sure movie novelizations serve much of a purpose in this day and age, when the Internet so readily caters to the whims of the cinematically obsessed… but I was vividly reminded of my my own obsession with novelizations this past weekend when trolling a New 2 You thrift store in Mason and discovering…

the novelization of the 1989 Batman movie by Craig Shaw Gardner.

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