thrift store finds: rejected finds, y’all!

It’s time for another round of Thrift Store Rejects. These are purchases I made at thrift stores which, for one reason or another, could not be stretched into their own post here. I take two or three of these “lesser” finds and quickly talk about them. Check ’em out behind the cut!

Small Doonesbury Paperbacks

My thoughts and opinions about Doonesbury were pretty well-covered when I wrote about the very first collection of strips, Still A Few Bugs in the System. This particular presentation of the Doonesbury strips are the ones I’m most familiar with, the books being about double the size of the way newspaper comic strips were being collected at the time.

Upon visiting a booksale a few weeks ago, I ran across these paperbacks, more traditionally sized! I always stress, I’m no scholar when it comes to the wares I present here and I was genuinely surprised to find Trudeau’s strip was collected in other formats at the time.

Voltron: The Buried Castle picturebook

I really enjoyed the TSF posts wherein I looked about a couple of He-Man picture books I found in our St. Vincent De Paul. I thought I might be able to work the same magic on this similarly sized Voltron book. I remembered the cartoon and believe I owned a couple of the toys as a kid. The cartoon is nigh unwatchable today, having been assembled out of the parts of two or three separate animes. Still, I hoped having nostalgic memories of something has carried the day before in these columns.

This picture book is notable as being one of the shoddiest presentations of a story I’ve ever seen anywhere. The story is overlong and complex. The pictures accompanying the story look like someone paused a VHS cassette of the show and took some snapshots with the camera they use on vacations.

It’s a ridiculous book… but it’s also mind-numbingly boring and I couldn’t bring myself to invest more than these two paragraphs into writing about it. Oh, but I’d also like to note this:

This book is so bad, it couldn’t be sold for fourteen cents until my stupid ass came along. Go me.

Rocky 2 movie novelization

I remember being in grade school and getting into a fight with one of my fellow classmates over the Rocky movies… or more specifically, his assertion that the Rocky tetralogy (Rocky V had just been released) were better movies than the Star Wars trilogy. This wasn’t a contentious argument although it very well could have been if I had seen ANY of the Rocky movies at that time. I hadn’t, so I merely voiced my preference for a galaxy far, far away. Much later, I did see Rocky 1 through IV (still haven’t gotten to V) and I like them quite a bit. IV in particular, is a beautifully insane product of its’ time.

I’m loathe to write whole TSF posts about novelizations lately because they’re not very visually interesting, but I was thinking about making an exception for Rocky 2 for two reasons. One, the credited author is Sylvester Stallone himself himself! I have my doubts about the veracity of this but I cannot find any other attribution to the novelization. I will hereafter refer to the author as Stallone, although I welcome any information to the contrary.

Secondly, Stallone made an interesting choice when writing the novelization for Rocky 2. Most novelizations I’ve read are written in third person; this one is written in the first person! In fact, Rocky is relating his story to us as the narrator. This is fantastically weird, considering one of the most endearing traits about Rocky Balboa is that he’s not the brightest bulb in the chandelier. In other words, LOTS of apostrophes are used to shorten off words into a form that simulates a less educated person’s dialect.

I love that Stallone made this choice. It renders the Rocky 2 novelization unique and interesting… albeit not interesting enough to rate a TSF of its’ own.

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